DaisyFAQ - Phone Book Management

This FAQ or list of "Frequently Asked Questions" is continuously updated, but if you have a specific one, then send us an E-Mail.

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Can I Add Extra Fields to the Phone Book?
How Do I Create a New Phone Book?
How Do I Open a Phone Book?
How Do I Remove a Phone Book?
How is the Phone Book Structured?
What is the Default Phone Book?
What is the Working Phone Book?

Can I Add Extra Fields to the Phone Book?

Yes!

This is fully described under Setting up AddressWise.

How Do I Create a New Phone Book?

Start AddressWise and do not open any Phone Books.

AddressWise Control Screen

Click the command button, Add New Phone Book, or choose the Add New command from the Phone Books menu. The following dialog will be shown.

Enter a name for the new Phone Book and then click OK.

Note that certain characters are not allowed.

How Do I Open a Phone Book?

On the main AddressWise dialog, select the required Phone Book from the list.

Then click Edit, Print, Use Phone Book.

How Do I Remove a Phone Book?

On the main AddressWise dialog, select the required Phone Book from the list.

Then use the command Delete in the Phone Books menu.

Note that you can't delete a Phone Book, that contains data. You must use the Clear Phone Book command button to remove all the data from the Phone Book.

How is the Phone Book Structured?

The FaxWise/AddressWise Phone Book is a simple Microsoft Access database with a name of phbook.mdb. It is usually stored in the main FaxWise directory, c:\ecac.

All of the individual Phone Books are identified by a special field in the database.

What is the Default Phone Book?

The Default Phone Book is a Phone Book that has been selected, so that when FaxWise opens the FaxWise/AddressWise Phone Book all actions will be performed initially on that Phone Book.

What is the Working Phone Book?

When AddressWise sends a fax using FaxWise, it puts all of the recipients into a special Working Phone Book. This means that FaxWise can distribute the fax with the least number of keystrokes and the minimum amount of effort.

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Copyright 1998 by James Miller of Daisy Analysis